Aim to be a Great Leader? Don’t be a Hero.

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We love our heroes. They stay alert for danger and then swoop in to save the day.

Everyday heroes may not be looking for danger but they are wired to be the person who saves the day, or in a workplace perhaps it is that they are the go-to person to solve a sticky problem.

A great leader isn’t the person to solve every problem, even if he or she could do so.

A great leader builds up others so that they solve the problems they encounter or foresee.

This is especially powerful when it creates closer collaboration within a team and across teams.

Does this mean you never help solve problems? No. If you (still) are an expert in a particular area or topic, and the team asks you to step into the problem as an expert, then you’ll do so. At that time you are in the role of the expert and not in the role of the leader.

“A great leader feels no need to be the hero. A great leader builds a team and supports them being a hero in their role.” ~ Lori Michele Leavitt

www.thepivotbook.com
www.thepivotbook.com

To learn more about building a great workplace and realizing performance breakthroughs (without being the hero)…

Get my new book <

The Pivot: Orchestrating Extraordinary Business Momentum.

Safe to speak up. Power to be heard.

Are you including effective communication as an area for growth in performance?

An important aspect of coaching for better performance is aimed at communication. This includes improving the dynamics and effectiveness in meetings as well as helping individuals be more clear and concise in their delivery of ideas and feedback.

A recent article by weforum.org speaks to the unheard voices of women in the workplace.
Continue reading “Safe to speak up. Power to be heard.”

Kill Performance Measurement & Ratings?

Today’s news shouts that traditional performance management is “bad.”  “We’ve killed performance ratings!” and “We’ve killed the annual performance review!” are phrases being touted as if, by removing a process, the company has instantaneously changed its culture.   In many cases this feels more like marketing than real change.  It takes courage to change the behaviors driving the culture that may not be working for you right now.

You came to this post to hear about performance rating, and whether to kill this process or not.  Continue reading to explore 5 dos and don’ts related to rating performance in a healthy, growing workplace. Continue reading “Kill Performance Measurement & Ratings?”

Excellence – Found, Made or Elusive?

“Why is it so hard to find an excellent employee?”

That was the subject of a recent discussion in a leadership group on Linkedin. Responses (over one thousand to date!) can be grouped into four main themes:
1. that it is indeed nearly impossible to find an excellent person to hire;
2. that there are many excellent people, but they are in the wrong jobs;
3. that the right person may be out of work and not getting noticed; or
4. that employers are so far below excellence that no individual could be excellent in their employ.

Where’s the issue? Is it in the selection? hiring? alignment of person to role? management? something else? all of the above?
Continue reading “Excellence – Found, Made or Elusive?”

Alignment Series #3: When strategy changes

In Series #1 and #2 I discussed the best steps for aligning people with strategy and how to know when strategy must change.

In this post l get to the execution part of a change in strategy and answer, “How do you re-align people when strategy must change in a way that changes their daily work?”

For their Sept 2015 newsletter, Palladium Group, founded by the fathers of the Balanced Scorecard, Robert Kaplan and David Norton, asked a few thought leaders including me to provide guidance to their readers on this subject.

How Do You Align Culture with Strategy?

Want to get what you expect, even when your expectations change frequently as your company grows? Create clarity around how problems will be discovered, communicated and solved. Communication between individuals and managers can ensure that decisions are made, and resources are allocated smartly – and aimed at keeping execution on track with strategy.
Continue reading “Alignment Series #3: When strategy changes”

Alignment Series #2: How do you know when strategy must change?

In the first post of this series, I shared three proven steps in aligning people with strategy.

During times of significant change, alignment requires more attention from leaders and managers. This is especially the case when what is required to execute a new strategy involves more than small tweaks in people’s daily work.

How do you know when strategy must change?

John Caplan explains this well in the first 1.5 minutes of the video below.

He describes an ad agency with a strategy to do cool work but their strength was to do really great, but not cool, retail work. They changed their strategy and landed a deal with Starbucks.

Continue reading “Alignment Series #2: How do you know when strategy must change?”

Alignment Series #1: How to align people with strategy

Strategies change.  At least they should – in order to even just keep up with the change around us.

This series addresses Alignment.  How can you align your people with strategy?  How do you know when strategy must change? (even when it hasn’t been a year)?  How do you re-align people when strategy must change in a way that changes their daily work?

Let’s talk about the first step – aligning people with strategy (when the strategy does not require significant change in roles or the work people do).   Continue reading “Alignment Series #1: How to align people with strategy”

Align YOU with what you do.

Feel great & do even better! Who doesn’t want that for themselves? Who wouldn’t want that for others? So of course we foster feeling great at work. whoops! screech. halt. back up. We don’t? Why not? Mostly because what we think we need to do is hard. But they really are NOT what is needed, or wanted. I call these Better Business Management Myths and I’ve listed three for you below: Continue reading “Align YOU with what you do.”